Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Spring!


Another Easter arrived last weekend. We colored eggs, made spring foods and had our bouquets of pussy willows, Easter Lily and daffodils. I feel new energy and excitement, knowing the garden and potting shed will soon be humming again and the deck will replace the living room.

Ok--this "think yourself thin" business is working. I've lost 7 pounds. It has been mostly my mental shift that has allowed me to eat differently. I'm eating purposefully. I know the "superfoods" for health: deeply-colored fruits and vegetables, fish, turkey, beans, soy, oats, nuts, yogurt and tea. I keep those foods in the house. If I don't have them, I can't eat well. I find diet books and articles somewhat helpful and inspiring and I use them for recipe ideas, but I like exciting cookbooks better--the ones that contain small meals full of flavor. My breakfast today was 1 hard-boiled egg, half a slice of whole-grain bread, a chopped tomato and a small apple, cubed and rolled in a bit of walnut oil and ground walnuts. I actually couldn't finish the whole egg--it was all so satisfying. I'll have my daily smoothie later. It's usually made with some type of frozen fruit and skim milk. My favorite is frozen bananas, a spoon of Nutella and skim milk. However, a tropical fruit smoothie with cream of coconut added is pretty darn good!

My lunch will be "Tapas" style--small amounts of a variety of good foods that I have on hand. There is leftover pork that can be a small pork medallion with a bit of Asiago cheese over it, some baked sweet potato--I can glaze a couple chunks of that with some acacia honey and microwave it a couple minutes. On the side I think I'll add a marinated artichoke, a bit of sour-cream cucumber salad and a couple grape tomatoes drizzled with a bit of olive oil and fresh basil.

If I plan my meals with emphasis on small amounts and lots of flavor, I have the perfect combination. And I've already started running out to the herb garden this spring. The new chives are up, the parsley is producing its second-year crop and the thyme survived the winter well.